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Original research article


Assessing the performance of imaging health systems in five selected hospitals in Uganda

Michael G KawooyaGeorge PariyoElsie Kiguli MalwaddeRosemary ByanyimaHarriet Kisembo
Departments of Radiology, Ernest Cook Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Health Services Research, School of Public Health, Radiology, School of Medicine, Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda
Date of Submission: 12-Oct-2011, Date of Acceptance: 19-Feb-2012, Date of Web Publication: 22-Mar-2012.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Michael G. Kawooya

ECUREI, c/o Mengo Hospital, Albert Cook Road, Albert Cook Building, P.O. BOX 7161, Kampala, Uganda
E-mail: kawooyagm@yahoo.co.uk

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Michael G. Kawooya

ECUREI, c/o Mengo Hospital, Albert Cook Road, Albert Cook Building, P.O. BOX 7161, Kampala, Uganda
E-mail: kawooyagm@yahoo.co.uk

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.94225 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Objectives: The first objective of the study was to develop an index termed as the ‘Imaging Coverage’ (IC), for measuring the performance of the imaging health systems. This index together with the Hospital-Based Utilization (HBU) would then be calculated for five Ugandan hospitals. Second, was to relate the financial resources and existing health policy to the performance of the imaging systems.
Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey employing the triangulation methodology, conducted in Mulago National Referral Hospital. The qualitative study used cluster sampling, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and self-administered questionnaires to explore the non-measurable aspects of the imaging systems’ performances.
Results: The IC developed and tested as an index for the imaging system’s performance was 36%. General X-rays had the best IC followed by ultrasound. The Hospital-Based Utilization for the five selected hospitals was 186 per thousand and was the highest for general radiography followed by ultrasound.
Conclusion: The IC for the five selected hospitals was 36% and the HBU was 186 per thousand, reflecting low performance levels, largely attributable to inadequate funding. There were shortfalls in imaging requisitions and inefficiencies in the imaging systems, financing, and health policy. Although the proportion of inappropriate imaging was small, reducing this inappropriateness even further would lead to a significant total saving, which could be channeled into investigating more patients. Financial resources stood out as the major limitation in attaining the desired performance and there is a need to increase budget funding so as to improve the performance of the imaging health systems.
Keywords: Imaging Health Systems, Performance, Utilization

Cited in 3 Documents

  1. Michael G. Kawooya, Azza Hammou, Hassen A. Gharbi and Lawrence Lau (2014) Radiological Safety and Quality. (Chapter 20):339. doi: 10.1007/978-94-007-7256-4_20
  2. Bhavya Rehani, Isaiah Brown, Shebani Dandekar, Benjamin Sarkodie, Gladys Mwango, Madan M. Rehani, Lawrence Lau, Yi C. Zhang and William P. Dillon (2017) Radiology Education in Africa: Analysis of Results From 13 African Countries. Journal of the American College of Radiology 14(2):247. doi: 10.1016/j.jacr.2016.08.012
  3. Juliana Bueno and Spencer Gay (2016) Support to Radiology Residency Programs in Developing Countries: Our Experience in Uganda With the Mbarara University of Science and Technology. Journal of the American College of Radiology 13(9):1121. doi: 10.1016/j.jacr.2016.04.001

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