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Original research article


CAD May Not be Necessary for Microcalcifications in the Digital era, CAD May Benefit Radiologists for Masses

Stamatia V DestounisAndrea L ArienoRenee C Morgan
Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC., Rochester, NY, USA
Date of Submission: 23-Apr-2012, Date of Acceptance: 14-Jun-2012, Date of Web Publication: 28-Jul-2012.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Stamatia V. Destounis

Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC., Rochester, NY 14620, USA.
E-mail: sdestounis@ewbc.com

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Stamatia V. Destounis

Elizabeth Wende Breast Care, LLC., Rochester, NY 14620, USA.
E-mail: sdestounis@ewbc.com

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.99179 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of computer-aided detection (CAD) to mark the cancer on digital mammograms at the time of breast cancer diagnosis and also review retrospectively whether CAD marked the cancer if visible on any available prior mammograms, thus potentially identifying breast cancer at an earlier stage. We sought to determine why breast lesions may or may not be marked by CAD. In particular, we analyzed factors such as breast density, mammographic views, and lesion characteristics.
Materials and Methods: Retrospective review from 2004 to 2008 revealed 3445 diagnosed breast cancers in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients; 1293 of these were imaged with full field digital mammography (FFDM). After cancer diagnosis, in a retrospective review held by the radiologist staff, 43 of these cancers were found to be visible on prior-year mammograms (false-negative cases); these breast cancer cases are the basis of this analysis. All cases had CAD evaluation available at the time of cancer diagnosis and on prior mammography studies. Data collected included patient demographics, breast density, palpability, lesion type, mammographic size, CAD marks on current- and prior-year mammograms, needle biopsy method, pathology results (core needle and/or surgical), surgery type, and lesion size.
Results: On retrospective review of the mammograms by the staff radiologists, 43 cancers were discovered to be visible on prior-year mammograms. All 43 cancers were masses (mass classification included mass, mass with calcification, and mass with architectural distortion); no pure microcalcifications were identified in this cohort. Mammograms with CAD applied at the time of breast cancer diagnosis were able to detect 79% (34/43) of the cases and 56% (24/43) from mammograms with CAD applied during prior year(s). In heterogeneously dense/extremely dense tissue, CAD marked 79% (27/34) on mammograms taken at the time of diagnosis and 56% (19/34) on mammograms with CAD applied during the prior year(s). At time of diagnosis, CAD marked lesions in 32% (11/34) on the craniocaudal (CC) view, 21% (7/34) on the mediolateral oblique (MLO) view. Lesion size of those marked by CAD or not marked were similar, the average being 15 and 12 mm, respectively.
Conclusion: CAD marked cancers on mammograms at the time of diagnosis in 79% of the cases and in 56% of the cases from the mammograms with CAD applied in the prior year(s). Our review demonstrated that CAD can mark invasive breast carcinomas in even dense breast tissue. CAD marked a significant portion on the CC view only, which may be an indicator to radiologists to be especially vigilant when a lesion is marked on this view.
Keywords: Breast Carcinoma, Breast Imaging, Calcifications, Computer-aided Detection, Digital Mammography

Cited in 2 Documents

  1. Yiming Gao, Krzysztof J. Geras, Alana A. Lewin and Linda Moy (2019) New Frontiers: An Update on Computer-Aided Diagnosis for Breast Imaging in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. American Journal of Roentgenology 212(2):300. doi: 10.2214/AJR.18.20392
  2. Samrudhdhi B. Rangrej and Jayanthi Sivaswamy (2017) Assistive lesion-emphasis system: an assistive system for fundus image readers. J. Med. Imag 4(2):024503. doi: 10.1117/1.JMI.4.2.024503

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