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Review article


Imaging of tuberculosis of the abdominal viscera: beyond the intestines.

Sree Harsha TirumaniVijayanadh OjiliGowthaman GunabushanamAlampady Krishna Prasad ShanbhogueArpit NagarNajla FasihKedar N Chintapalli
Date of Submission: 13-Feb-2013, Date of Acceptance: 08-Mar-2013, Date of Web Publication: 30-Apr-2013.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Vijayanadh Ojili

Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive MS 7800, San Antonio 78229, Texas, United States of America.
E-mail: ojili@uthscsa.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Vijayanadh Ojili

Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive MS 7800, San Antonio 78229, Texas, United States of America.
E-mail: ojili@uthscsa.edu

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.111234 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


There is an increasing incidence of both intra- and extra-thoracic manifestations of tuberculosis, in part due to the AIDS epidemic. Isolated tubercular involvement of the solid abdominal viscera is relatively unusual. Cross-sectional imaging with ultrasound, multidetector computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the diagnosis and post treatment follow-up of tuberculosis. Specific imaging features of tuberculosis are frequently related to caseous necrosis, which is the hallmark of this disease. However, depending on the type of solid organ involvement, tubercular lesions can mimic a variety of neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions. Often, cross-sectional imaging alone is insufficient in reaching a conclusive diagnosis, and image-guided tissue sampling is needed. In this article, we review the pathology and cross-sectional imaging features of tubercular involvement of solid abdominopelvic organs with a special emphasis on appropriate differential diagnoses.
Keywords: Abdomen, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Tuberculosis

Cited in 7 Documents

  1. Richard P. T. Evans, Moustafa Mabrouk Mourad, Lee Dvorkin and Simon R. Bramhall (2016) Hepatic and Intra-abdominal Tuberculosis: 2016 Update. Curr Infect Dis Rep 18(12):. doi: 10.1007/s11908-016-0546-5
  2. Satarupa Roy, Shuchi Bhatt, Rajesh Rawal, Anupama Tandon and Neha Meena (2017) Splenic Vein Thrombosis as a Rare Complication of Disseminated Tuberculosis – Imaging Diagnosis and Case Report. Pol J Radiol 82:106. doi: 10.12659/PJR.900198
  3. Cumhur Artuk and Hanefi Cem Gul (2019) Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis. (Chapter 4):43. doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-04744-3_4
  4. Aoife Kilcoyne (2016) Inflammatory bowel disease imaging: Current practice and future directions. WJG 22(3):917. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v22.i3.917
  5. Rabii Noomene, Asma Ouakaa, Raja Jouini, Anis Ben Maamer and Abderraouf Cherif (2017) What remains to surgeons in the management of abdominal tuberculosis? A 10 years experience in an endemic area. Indian Journal of Tuberculosis 64(3):167. doi: 10.1016/j.ijtb.2017.01.003
  6. Uma Debi (2014) Abdominal tuberculosis of the gastrointestinal tract: Revisited. WJG 20(40):14831. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v20.i40.14831
  7. Lilishia Gounder, Pravikrishnen Moodley, Paul K. Drain, Andrew J. Hickey and Mahomed-Yunus S. Moosa (2017) Hepatic tuberculosis in human immunodeficiency virus co-infected adults: a case series of South African adults. BMC Infect Dis 17(1):. doi: 10.1186/s12879-017-2222-2

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