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Original research article


Spectrum of high resolution computed tomography findings in occupational lung disease: experience in a tertiary care institute.

Satija BhawnaU C OjhaSanyal KumarRajiv GuptaDipti GothiR S Pal
Department of Radiodiagnosis, Delhi State Cancer Institute, Institute of Occupational Health, Education and Research, Departments of Radiodiagnosis, and Pulmonary Medicine, Employee’s State Insurance Hospital and Post Graduate Institute of Medical Science and Research, Basaidarapur, New Delhi, India
Date of Submission: 10-Jul-2013, Date of Acceptance: 19-Aug-2013, Date of Web Publication: 31-Dec-2013.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

U. C. Ojha

Director, Institute of Occupational Health, Education and Research, Employee’s State Insurance Hospital and Post Graduate Institute of Medical Science and Research, Basaidarapur, New Delhi, India.
E-mail: ucojha@rediffmail.com

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

U. C. Ojha

Director, Institute of Occupational Health, Education and Research, Employee’s State Insurance Hospital and Post Graduate Institute of Medical Science and Research, Basaidarapur, New Delhi, India.
E-mail: ucojha@rediffmail.com

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.124097 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Objective: To study the spectrum of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in occupational lung disease in industrial workers and to assess the utility of International classification of HRCT for occupational and environmental respiratory diseases (ICHOERD).
Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of radiological data (radiographs and computed tomography chest scans) gathered over a period of 3 years (January 2010- December 2012) of industrial workers in an organised sector who presented with respiratory complaints. The HRCT findings were evaluated using ICHOERD.
Results: There were 5 females and 114 males in the study, with a mean age of 49 years. These workers were exposed to different harmful agents including silica, asbestos, cotton dust, metal dust, iron oxide, organic dust, rubber fumes, plastic fumes, acid fumes, and oil fumes. There were 10 smokers in the study. The radiograph of chest was normal in 53 patients. 46% of these normal patients (21.8% of total) demonstrated positive findings on HRCT. When the radiograph was abnormal, HRCT provided more accurate information and excluded the other diagnosis. The HRCT findings were appropriately described using the ICHOERD. Bronchiectasis was the most common finding (44.5%) with mild central cylindrical bronchiectasis as the most common pattern. Pleural thickening was seen in 41 patients (34.5%). Enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymphnodes were seen in 10 patients (8.4%) with egg-shell calcification in 1 patient exposed to silica. Bronchogenic carcinoma was seen in 1 patient exposed to asbestos.
Conclusions: Occupational lung disease is a common work related condition in industrial workers even in the organized sector. Though chest radiograph is the primary diagnostic tool, HRCT is the undisputed Gold Standard for evaluation of these patients. Despite the disadvantage of radiation exposure, low dose CT may serve as an important tool for screening and surveillance. The ICHOERD is a powerful and reliable tool not only for diagnosis, but also for quantitative and analytical measurement of disease, thereby contributing to assessing the medical epidemiology of lung disease. It should always be used while evaluating HRCT of a patient with occupational lung disease.
Keywords: Classification, ICHOERD, High Resolution Computed Tomography, Industrial Worker, Occupational Lung Disease

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