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Pictorial essay


Imaging Features of AlloDerm(®) Used in Postmastectomy Breast Reconstructions.

Christine U LeeAllison J ClappSteven R Jacobson
Departments of Radiology, Plastic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905 Rochester, MN 55905, USA
Date of Submission: 29-Jan-2014, Date of Acceptance: 26-Mar-2014, Date of Web Publication: 29-Apr-2014.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Christine Lee

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 Frist Street SW, Rochester MN 55905, USA.
E-mail: lee.christine@mayo.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Christine Lee

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 Frist Street SW, Rochester MN 55905, USA.
E-mail: lee.christine@mayo.edu

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.131641 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


The purpose of this pictorial essay is to demonstrate the imaging features (ultrasound, mammogram, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) of AlloDerm(®)(LifeCell Corp.; Branchburg, NJ), an acellular dermal matrix sometimes used in both primary and reconstructive breast surgeries. AlloDerm(®) is derived from cadaveric dermis and provides an immunologically inert scaffold in tissue reconstruction. Since there is little literature on the imaging of this substance, radiologists may be unfamiliar with its appearance in breast imaging. For this manuscript, ex vivo and in vivo images of AlloDerm(®) in postmastectomy patients were evaluated using different imaging modalities. The appearance of AlloDerm(®) can vary based on length of time postsurgery and incorporation into the host. AlloDerm(®) appears as an isodense to glandular tissue on a mammogram and isoechoic to glandular tissue on ultrasound imaging. On MRI, in comparison with normal breast parenchyma, AlloDerm(®) is hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging and isointense on T1-weighted imaging and demonstrates mild enhancement. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first multimodality imaging description of AlloDerm(®) used in postmastectomy patients. The conformation of AlloDerm(®) at surgical placement and the degree of host cell migration and neoangiogenesis are factors to take into consideration when performing diagnostic evaluations; and, familiarity with the various imaging appearances of AlloDerm(®) can be helpful to exclude residual or recurrent disease.
Keywords: AlloDerm®, Breast Reconstruction, Imaging, Mastectomy, Radiology

Cited in 4 Documents

  1. Simon Lowes, Fiona MacNeill, Lee Martin, Joe M. O'Donoghue, Mandana O. Pennick, Alan Redman and Robin Wilson (2018) Breast imaging for aesthetic surgery: British Society of Breast Radiology (BSBR), Association of Breast Surgery Great Britain & Ireland (ABS), British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS). Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery 71(11):1521. doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2018.07.004
  2. Mazin Merdad and David W. Eisele (2015) Acellular dermal matrices and revision parotid surgery. The Laryngoscope 125(9):2123. doi: 10.1002/lary.25301
  3. Frederick Wang and Hani Sbitany (2016) Breast Reconstruction. (Chapter 104):1053. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-18726-6_104
  4. Young Seon Kim (2016) Ultrasonography Findings of AlloDerm® Used in Postmastectomy Alloplastic Breast Reconstruction: A Case Report and Literature Review. Iran J Radiol 13(3):. doi: 10.5812/iranjradiol.38252

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