Go Back
This abstract was viewed 72 times

Case report


Severe aortic coarctation in an adult patient with normal brachial blood pressure.

Tina H LeetmaaBjarne L NørgaardHenning MølgaardJesper M Jensen
Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark
Date of Submission: 09-May-2014, Date of Acceptance: 25-Jun-2014, Date of Web Publication: 30-Jul-2014.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Tina H Leetmaa

Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupsgaardsvej 100, Aarhus N-8200, Denmark.
E-mail: tina.leetmaa@gmail.com

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Tina H Leetmaa

Department of Cardiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Brendstrupsgaardsvej 100, Aarhus N-8200, Denmark.
E-mail: tina.leetmaa@gmail.com

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.137835 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


The present case shows that a normal brachial blood pressure (BP) does not exclude severe coarctation and should be considered in normotensive patients presenting with a systolic murmur and/or unexplained severe left ventricular hypertrophy. Congenital coarctation of the aorta is a narrowing of the descending aorta, usually located distal to the origin of the subclavian artery, causing hypertension in the upper part of the body. This condition may be undiagnosed until adult life where the clinical presentation most often is high BP in the upper extremities. A 57-year-old patient with severe aortic coarctation and left ventricular hypertrophy presented with normal brachial BP. However, standard suprasternal view by echocardiography indicated coarctation. Multislice computed tomographic (CT) angiography revealed an uncommon location of the aortic narrowing with the right and left subclavian arteries originating below the area of coarctation, explaining the equally low BP in both upper extremities.
Keywords: Aortic Coarctation, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, Multislice Computed Tomography, Normal Blood Pressure

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.