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Review article


Use of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of superior semicircular canal dehiscence.

Ilson SepúlvedaThomas SchmidtEnrique Platín
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Service General Hospital of Concepcion, Cone Beam Concepcion, Advanced Craniofacial Imaging Center, Finis Terrae University School of Dentistry, SantiagoDepartment of Physician Otolaryngologist, Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Service, General Hospital of Concepcion. University of Concepción School of Medicine, Concepción, ChileDepartment of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA
Date of Submission: 18-Jun-2014, Date of Acceptance: 06-Aug-2014, Date of Web Publication: 30-Aug-2014.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Ilson Sepúlveda

Hospital of Concepcion, San Martin AV, Nº 1436, Concepción, Chile.
E-mail: isepulvedaguilar@gmail.com

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Ilson Sepúlveda

Hospital of Concepcion, San Martin AV, Nº 1436, Concepción, Chile.
E-mail: isepulvedaguilar@gmail.com

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.141554 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


Superior semicircular canal dehiscence is a relatively new syndrome in the field of otology. It is of unknown etiology presenting with a variety of vestibular and auditory symptoms and radiologic findings play a crucial role in its diagnosis. Cone beam computed tomography has been shown to be a powerful tool in the field of otolaryngology. It is a three dimensional technique that uses lower radiation resulting in fewer artifacts and offers higher resolution when compared with multi-slice computed tomography. It is considered to be an excellent imaging modality for radiological exploration of the ear.
Keywords: Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Dehiscence, Superior Semicircular Canal

Cited in 5 Documents

  1. Gianvincenzo Sparacia and Alberto Iaia (2017) Diagnostic performance of reformatted isotropic thin-section helical CT images in the detection of superior semicircular canal dehiscence. Neuroradiol J 30(3):216. doi: 10.1177/1971400916689484
  2. Till F. Jakob, Jan Kromeier, Tobias Baumann, Jens Pfeiffer, Marcus Neudert, Roland Laszig, Thomas Zahnert and Christian Offergeld (2017) Experimental Simulation of Clinical Borderline Situations in Temporal Bone Specimens After Ossiculoplasty. Ear and Hearing :1. doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000472
  3. Yohan Song, Jennifer C. Alyono, Ryan A. Bartholomew, Yona Vaisbuch, Carleton Eduardo Corrales and Nikolas H. Blevins (2018) Prevalence of Radiographic Cochlear–Facial Nerve Dehiscence. Otology & Neurotology 39(10):1319. doi: 10.1097/MAO.0000000000002015
  4. Emmerenceana Nchama Mahulu, Xintai Fan, Shouluan Ding, Pamela Jasmine Ouaye, Athumani Mohamedi Mambo, Magesa Machunde Mafuru and Anting Xu (2019) The variation of superior semicircular canal bone thickness in relation to age and gender. Acta Oto-Laryngologica :1. doi: 10.1080/00016489.2019.1595721
  5. Kimberley S. Noij, Maria J. Duarte, Kevin Wong, Y. Song Cheng, Salwa Masud, Barbara S. Herrmann, Hugh D. Curtin, Vivek V. Kanumuri, John J. Guinan, Elliott D. Kozin, Osama Tarabichi, David H. Jung, Daniel J. Lee and Steven D. Rauch (2018) Toward Optimizing Cervical Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP). Otology & Neurotology 39(2):212. doi: 10.1097/MAO.0000000000001655

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