Go Back
This abstract was viewed 64 times

Case report


The rare sprengel deformity: our experience with three cases.

Antonia BindoudiEleni P KarikiKonstantinos VasiliadisIoannis Tsitouridis
Department of Radiology, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece
Date of Submission: 27-Mar-2014, Date of Acceptance: 05-Sep-2014, Date of Web Publication: 27-Oct-2014.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Eleni P Kariki

"Papageorgiou" Hospital, Thessaloniki - 56403, Greece.
E-mail: eleni.kariki@bath.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Eleni P Kariki

"Papageorgiou" Hospital, Thessaloniki - 56403, Greece.
E-mail: eleni.kariki@bath.edu

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.143407 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


Sprengel shoulder is a rare congenital deformity of one or both scapulae that is usually detected at birth. It occurs due to failure of the scapula to descend during intrauterine development and its cause is still unknown. Although the deformity appears randomly most of the time, familial cases have been reported. Sprengel shoulder is often associated with Klippel-Feil syndrome and other congenital skeletal deformities. Anteroposterior X-ray imaging can accurately diagnose Sprengel deformity. However, computed tomography and magnetic resonance scans with three-dimensional reconstruction are nowadays used in everyday practice in order to diagnose concomitant abnormalities, study in detail the anatomy of the affected shoulder(s), and plan appropriate management. We present here our imaging experience from three pediatric cases with Sprengel shoulder and take the opportunity to discuss this rare entity, which is, nevertheless, the commonest congenital defect of the scapula.
Keywords: Birth Defects, Sprengel Deformity, High Scapula, Shoulder, Undescended Scapula

Cited in 1 Document

  1. Shuai Guo, Xue-Feng Fan, Jie-Yuan Jin, Liang-Liang Fan, Lei Zeng, Zheng-Bing Zhou, Rong Xiang and Ju-Yu Tang (2018) A novel proximal 3q29 chromosome microdeletion in a Chinese patient with Chiari malformation type II and Sprengel’s deformity. Mol Cytogenet 11(1):. doi: 10.1186/s13039-018-0358-4

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.