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Original research article


Uterine fibroid embolization for symptomatic fibroids: study at a teaching hospital in kenya.

John Kiprop MutaiSudhir VinayakWilliam StonesNigel HackingCharles Mariara
Department of Radiology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Malawi, Blantyre, Malawi, Department of Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHS), UK
Date of Submission: 07-Jul-2014, Date of Acceptance: 23-Feb-2015, Date of Web Publication: 31-Mar-2015.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

John Kiprop Mutai

Department of Radiology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.
E-mail: john.mutai@aku.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

John Kiprop Mutai

Department of Radiology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.
E-mail: john.mutai@aku.edu

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.154351 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Objective: Characterization of magnetic (MRI) features in women undergoing uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) and identification of clinical correlates in an African population.
Materials and Methods: Patients with symptomatic fibroids who are selected to undergo UFE at the hospital formed the study population. The baseline MRI features, baseline symptom score, short-term imaging outcome, and mid-term symptom scores were analyzed for interval changes. Assessment of potential associations between short-term imaging features and mid-term symptom scores was also done.
Results: UFE resulted in statistically significant reduction (P < 0.001) of dominant fibroid, uterine volumes, and reduction of symptom severity scores, which were 43.7%, 40.1%, and 37.8%, respectively. Also, 59% of respondents had more than 10 fibroids. The predominant location of the dominant fibroid was intramural. No statistically significant association was found between clinical and radiological outcome.
Conclusion: The response of uterine fibroids to embolization in the African population is not different from the findings reported in other studies from the west. The presence of multiple and large fibroids in this study is consistent with the case mix described in other studies of African-American populations. Patient counseling should emphasize the independence of volume reduction and symptom improvement. Though volume changes are of relevance for the radiologist in understanding the evolution of the condition and identifying potential technical treatment failures, it should not be the main basis of evaluation of treatment success.
Keywords: African Women, Embolization, Fibroid, Response

Cited in 2 Documents

  1. Bassam Nusair, Maher Maaita, Omar Taso, Anas Almasaleha, Ibrahim A. Abdelazim and Mohannad Abu Faza (2018) Management of Fibroids in Resource-Limited Settings. Curr Obstet Gynecol Rep 7(2):92. doi: 10.1007/s13669-018-0240-8
  2. Charles Mariara, Timona Obura, Nigel Hacking and William Stones (2017) One year symptom severity and health-related quality of life changes among Black African patients undergoing uterine fibroid embolisation. BMC Res Notes 10(1):. doi: 10.1186/s13104-017-2558-0

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