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Radiologic-Pathologic correlation


Cerebral Blastomycosis: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation of Solitary CNS Blastomycosis Mass-Like Infection.

Costas StavrakisAnanth NarayanOlga Voronel
Departments of Radiology and Pathology, Albany Medical Center Hospital, Albany, New York, USA
Date of Submission: 15-Apr-2015, Date of Acceptance: 07-May-2015, Date of Web Publication: 29-May-2015.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Ananth Narayan

Department of Radiology, Albany Medical Center Hospital, 43 New Scotland Avenue, MC‑113, Albany, New York, USA.
E-mail: narayaa@mail.amc.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Ananth Narayan

Department of Radiology, Albany Medical Center Hospital, 43 New Scotland Avenue, MC‑113, Albany, New York, USA.
E-mail: narayaa@mail.amc.edu

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.157854 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


Blastomycosis is a fungal infection rarely seen in clinical practice. Endemic to the Midwestern United States as well as the Canadian provinces of Manitoba and Ontario, Blastomyces dermatitidis characteristically involves the skin and lungs. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement, although a rare complication of this disease, can be fatal. The current literature on CNS blastomycosis primarily centers on the spectrum of traditional imaging features of T1- and T2-weighted imaging with which this entity can present. However, here we present the direct histopathologic correlation of the imaging findings of solitary mass like CNS blastomycosis, with an emphasis on the association of diffusion restriction within the lesion with a granulomatous immune response.
Keywords: Blastomyces Dermatitidis, CNS, Diffusion-weighted Imaging, Solitary

Cited in 1 Document

  1. Matthew William McCarthy and Thomas J Walsh (2017) Molecular diagnosis of invasive mycoses of the central nervous system. Expert Review of Molecular Diagnostics 17(2):129. doi: 10.1080/14737159.2017.1271716

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