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Case report


Obstructive Uropathy Secondary to Uretero-inguinal Hernia.

Lih En HongChrismin TanJordan Li
Departments of General Medicine, Radiology and Renal Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, Department of Renal Medicine, School of Medicine, Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Date of Submission: 25-Feb-2015, Date of Acceptance: 21-May-2015, Date of Web Publication: 29-Jun-2015.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Lih En Hong

Department of General Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Flinders Drive, Bedford Park ‑ 5042, South Australia, Australia.
E-mail: LihEn.Hong@health.sa.gov.au

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Lih En Hong

Department of General Medicine, Flinders Medical Centre, Flinders Drive, Bedford Park ‑ 5042, South Australia, Australia.
E-mail: LihEn.Hong@health.sa.gov.au

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.159448 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


Uretero-inguinal hernia in patients with native kidneys is rare. We report a case of an 84-year-old man who was diagnosed with obstructive uropathy secondary to uretero-inguinal hernia, with no past history of herniorrhaphy or congenital genitourinary malformation. Uretero-inguinal hernias are predominantly indirect inguinal hernias and may be paraperitoneal or extraperitoneal. Computed tomography (CT) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for uretero-inguinal hernia. Herniorrhaphy is indicated in all cases of uretero-inguinal hernia to prevent obstructive uropathy.
Keywords: Hernia, Inguinal Hernia, Obstructive Uropathy, Uretero-inguinal

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