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Review article


Identification of Cardiac and Aortic Injuries in Trauma with Multi-detector Computed Tomography.

Arvind K ShergillTishan MarajMark S BarszczykHelen CheungNavneet SinghAnna E Zavodni
Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Date of Submission: 06-Jul-2015, Date of Acceptance: 01-Aug-2015, Date of Web Publication: 31-Aug-2015.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Navneet Singh

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, AB‑204, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada.
E-mail: navneet.singh@utoronto.ca

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Navneet Singh

Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, AB‑204, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada.
E-mail: navneet.singh@utoronto.ca

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.163992 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


Blunt and penetrating cardiovascular (CV) injuries are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Rapid detection of these injuries in trauma is critical for patient survival. The advent of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has led to increased detection of CV injuries during rapid comprehensive scanning of stabilized major trauma patients. MDCT has the ability to acquire images with a higher temporal and spatial resolution, as well as the capability to create multiplanar reformats. This pictorial review illustrates several common and life-threatening traumatic CV injuries from a regional trauma center.
Keywords: Aortic Injuries, Cardiovascular, Multi-detector CT, Trauma

Cited in 1 Document

  1. Joseph J. Platz, Loic Fabricant and Mitch Norotsky (2017) Thoracic Trauma. Surgical Clinics of North America 97(4):783. doi: 10.1016/j.suc.2017.03.004

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