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Original research article


Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Dysfunction: Concordance of Clinical Findings, Doppler Ultrasound Examination, and Shunt Venography.

Joshua M OwenRon Charles Gaba
University of Illinois College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, Chicago, IL, USA
Date of Submission: 05-May-2016, Date of Acceptance: 14-Jun-2016, Date of Web Publication: 18-Jul-2016.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Ron Charles Gaba

Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, 1740 West Taylor Street, MC 931, Chicago, 60612 IL, USA.
E-mail: rgaba@uic.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Ron Charles Gaba

Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System, 1740 West Taylor Street, MC 931, Chicago, 60612 IL, USA.
E-mail: rgaba@uic.edu

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.186510 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Objectives: The objective of this study was to evaluate the concordance between clinical symptoms, Doppler ultrasound (US), and shunt venography for the detection of stent-graft transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) dysfunction.
Materials and Methods: Forty-one patients (M:F 30:11, median age 55 years) who underwent contemporaneous clinical exam, Doppler US, and TIPS venography between 2003 and 2014 were retrospectively studied. Clinical symptoms (recurrent ascites or variceal bleeding) were dichotomously classified as present/absent, and US and TIPS venograms were categorized in a binary fashion as normal/abnormal. US abnormalities included high/low (>190 or <90 cm/s) TIPS velocity, significant velocity rise/fall (>50 cm/s), absent flow, and return of antegrade intra-hepatic portal flow. Venographic abnormalities included shunt stenosis/occlusion and/or pressure gradient elevation. Clinical and imaging concordance rates were calculated.
Results: Fifty-two corresponding US examinations and venograms were assessed. The median time between studies was 3 days. Forty of 52 (77%) patients were symptomatic, 33/52 (64%) US examinations were abnormal, and 20/52 (38%) TIPS venograms were abnormal. Concordancebetween clinical symptoms and TIPS venography was 48% (25/52), while the agreement between US and shunt venography was 65% (34/52). Clinical symptoms and the US concurred in 60% (31/52) of the patients. The sensitivity of clinical symptoms and US for the detection of venographically abnormal shunts was 80% (16/20) and 85% (17/20), respectively. Both clinical symptoms and the US had low specificity (25%, 8/32 and 50%, 16/32) for venographically abnormal shunts.
Conclusion: Clinical findings and the US had low concordance rates with TIPS venography, with acceptable sensitivity but poor specificity. These findings suggest the need for improved noninvasive imaging methods for stent‑graft TIPS surveillance.
Keywords: Concordance, Doppler Ultrasound, Dysfunction, Surveillance, Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

Cited in 3 Documents

  1. Wuttiporn Manatsathit, Hrishikesh Samant, Panadeekarn Panjawatanan, Annie Braseth, Jane Suh, Mohammad Esmadi, Noah Wiedel and Thammasin Ingviya (2019) Performance of ultrasound for detection of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt dysfunction: a meta-analysis. Abdom Radiol :. doi: 10.1007/s00261-019-01981-w
  2. Shi-Hua Luo, Jian-Guo Chu, He Huang and Ke-Chun Yao (2017) Effect of initial stent position on patency of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. WJG 23(26):4779. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v23.i26.4779
  3. Vicki R. Franklin, Layla Q. Simmons and Anthony L. Baker (2018) Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt: A Literature Review. Journal of Diagnostic Medical Sonography 34(2):114. doi: 10.1177/8756479317746338

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