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Original research article


Integrating Ultrasound Teaching into Preclinical Problem-based Learning.

Eli Tumba TshibwabwaJenifer CannonJames RiceMichael G KawooyaReza SaniiRobert Mallin
Departments of Clinical Medicine, Behavioral Science and Neuroscience and Physiology, College of Medicine, American University of Antigua, Antigua and BarbudaDepartment of Radiology, Ernest Cook Ultrasound Research and Education Institute, Mengo Hospital, Kampala, UgandaDepartment of Radiology, McMaster University Faculty of Health Sciences, HSC Building, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Date of Submission: 20-Jun-2016, Date of Acceptance: 31-Jul-2016, Date of Web Publication: 20-Sep-2016.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Eli Tumba Tshibwabwa

Department of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, American University of Antigua, University Park, Jabberwock Beach Road, Coolidge, Antigua, Barbuda.
E-mail: etumba@auamed.net

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Eli Tumba Tshibwabwa

Department of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, American University of Antigua, University Park, Jabberwock Beach Road, Coolidge, Antigua, Barbuda.
E-mail: etumba@auamed.net

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ABSTRACT



Objectives: The aim is to provide students in the preclinical with ultrasound image interpretation skills. Research question: Are students in smaller groups with access to a combination of lectures and hands-on patient contact most likely to have better ultrasound image interpretation skills, than students in larger groups with only interactive didactic lectures?
Methodology: First-year students at the preclinical Program of the College of Medicine, participated in two 2-h introductory interactive ultrasound sessions. The study comprised two cohorts: 2012/2013 students, who were offered large group teaching (LGT) sessions (control group), and 2013/2014 students, who received the intervention in small group learning problem-based learning (PBL) sessions (experimental group). The overall learning objectives were identical for both groups. The success of the module was evaluated using pre- and post-tests as well as students’ feedback.
Results: The students in the experimental group showed significantly higher scores in interpretations of images than those in the control group. The experimental group showed achievement of learning outcomes along with higher levels of satisfaction with the module compared to the latter.
Conclusion: Posttest knowledge of the basics of ultrasound improved significantly over the pretest in the experimental group. In addition, students’ overall satisfaction of the ultrasound module was shown to be higher for the PBL compared to the LGT groups. Small groups in an interactive and PBL setting along with opportunities for hands-on practice and simultaneous visualization of findings on a high definition screen should enhance preclinical student learning of the basics of ultrasound. Despite the potential of ultrasound as a clinical, teaching and learning tool for students in the preclinical years, standardized recommendations have yet to be created regarding its integration into the curricula within academic institutions and clinical medicine. The interactive and PBL is here to stay at the college of medicine.Further research would be carried out to see if this trend persists in the upcoming vertical system-based curriculum of the college of medicine.
Keywords: Diagnostic Radiology, Education And Administration, Problem-based Learning, Ultrasound Teaching, Undergraduate Medical Program

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