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Original research article


Multimodality Imaging Characteristics of the Common Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes: An Analysis of 544 Pathologically Proven Tumors.

Winnie FuGuan HuangZaahir MolooSafwat GirgisVimal H PatelGavin Low
Departments of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging and Pathology, University of Alberta Hospital, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Date of Submission: 24-Aug-2016, Date of Acceptance: 20-Nov-2016, Date of Web Publication: 29-Dec-2016.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Winnie Fu

Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospital, 2A2.41 WMC, 8440‑112 Street, Edmonton, AB T6G 2B7, Canada.
E-mail: akaie_stm@hotmail.com

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Winnie Fu

Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospital, 2A2.41 WMC, 8440‑112 Street, Edmonton, AB T6G 2B7, Canada.
E-mail: akaie_stm@hotmail.com

DOI: 10.4103/2156-7514.197026 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Objectives: The objective of this study was to define the characteristic imaging appearances of the common renal cell carcinoma (RCC) subtypes.
Materials and Methods: The Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, and informed consent was waived. 520 patients (336 men, 184 women; age range, 22–88 years) underwent preoperative cross-sectional imaging of 544 RCCs from 2008 to 2013. The imaging appearances of the RCCs and clinical information were reviewed. Data analysis was performed using parametric and nonparametric statistics, descriptive statistics, and receiver operating characteristic analysis.
Results: The RCC subtypes showed significant differences (P < 0.001) in several imaging parameters such as tumor margins, tumor consistency, tumor homogeneity, the presence of a central stellate scar, T2 signal intensity, and the degree of tumor enhancement. Low T2 signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed differentiation of papillary RCC from clear cell and chromophobe RCCs with 90.9% sensitivity and 93.1% specificity. A tumor‑to‑cortex ratio ≥1 on the corticomedullary phase had 98% specificity for clear cell RCC.
Conclusion: The T2 signal intensity of the tumor on MRI and its degree of enhancement are useful imaging parameters for discriminating between the RCC subtypes while gross morphological findings offer additional value in RCC profiling.
Keywords: Corticomedullary Phase, T2 Signal Intensity, Multimodality Imaging, Renal Cell Carcinoma Subtypes, Tumor-to-cortex Ratio

Cited in 4 Documents

  1. Sangjun Yoo, Dalsan You, In Gab Jeong, Cheryn Song, Bumsik Hong, Jun Hyuk Hong, Hanjong Ahn and Choung-Soo Kim (2017) Histologic subtype needs to be considered after partial nephrectomy in patients with pathologic T1a renal cell carcinoma: papillary vs. clear cell renal cell carcinoma. J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 143(9):1845. doi: 10.1007/s00432-017-2430-6
  2. Nicola Schieda, Robert S. Lim, Satheesh Krishna, Matthew D. F. McInnes, Trevor A. Flood and Rebecca E. Thornhill (2018) Diagnostic Accuracy of Unenhanced CT Analysis to Differentiate Low-Grade From High-Grade Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinoma. American Journal of Roentgenology 210(5):1079. doi: 10.2214/AJR.17.18874
  3. Andrew A. Renshaw, Alex Powell, Jorge Caso and Edwin W. Gould (2019) Needle track seeding in renal mass biopsies. Cancer Cytopathology :. doi: 10.1002/cncy.22147
  4. Matthew A. Chiarello, Rahul D. Mali and Stella K. Kang (2018) Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI for Detection of Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. American Journal of Roentgenology 211(4):812. doi: 10.2214/AJR.17.19462

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