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Radiologic-Pathologic correlation


Radiologic Pathologic Correlation: Acellular Dermal Matrix Alloderm Used in Breast Reconstructive Surgery

Christine U LeeAleh BobrJorge Torres-Mora
Departments of Radiology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA
Date of Submission: 27-Jan-2017, Date of Acceptance: 17-Feb-2017, Date of Web Publication: 28-Mar-2017.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Christine U Lee

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
E-mail: lee.christine@mayo.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Christine U Lee

Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
E-mail: lee.christine@mayo.edu

DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_7_17 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) such as Alloderm® is sometimes used in tissue reconstruction in primary and reconstructive breast surgeries. As ADM is incorporated into the native tissues, the evolving imaging fi ndings that would correlate with varying degrees of host migration and neoangiogenesis into the matrix can be challenging to recognize. In the setting of a palpable or clinical area of concern after breast reconstructive surgery following breast cancer, confi dent diagnosis of a mass representing ADM rather than recurring or developing disease can be challenging. Such diagnostic imaging uncertainties generally result in short-term imaging and clinical follow-up, but occasionally, biopsy is performed for histopathological confi rmation of benignity. A case of biopsy-proven Alloderm® is described. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first radiologic-pathologic correlation of ADM in the literature.
Keywords: Acellular dermal matrix, Alloderm®, Biopsy, Pathology, Ultrasound

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