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Original research article


Extra-pituitary Cerebral Anomalies in Pediatric Patients of Ectopic Neurohypophysis: An Uncommon Association.

Deb K BoruahShantiranjan SanyalArjun PrakashSashidhar AcharRajanikant R YadavT PravakaranDhaval D DhinganiBarun K Sarmah
Department of Radiodiagnosis, Assam Medical College, Dibrugarh, AssamDepartment of Radiodiagnosis, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow,Uttar PradeshDepartment of Radiodiagnosis, Sikkim Manipal Institute of Medical Sciences, Sikkim, IndiaDepartment of Radiology, Airedale General Hospital, West Yorkshire, UK
Date of Submission: 15-Mar-2017, Date of Acceptance: 26-Apr-2017, Date of Web Publication: 22-May-2017.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Deb K Boruah

RCC‑4, M‑Lane, Assam Medical College Campus, Dibrugarh ‑ 786 002, Assam, India.
E-mail: drdeb_rad@yahoo.co.in

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Deb K Boruah

RCC‑4, M‑Lane, Assam Medical College Campus, Dibrugarh ‑ 786 002, Assam, India.
E-mail: drdeb_rad@yahoo.co.in

DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_23_17 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Context: Ectopic neurohypophysis (EN) refers to an interrupted, nonvisualized, and thinned out pituitary stalk with ectopic location of the posterior pituitary gland. Concurrent extra-pituitary cerebral and extra-cranial anomalies have been rarely reported in patients of EN.
Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of extra-pituitary cerebral anomalies in pediatric patients of EN.
Settings and Design: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care center.
Subjects and Methods: The study group comprised eight pediatric patients of EN associated with extra-pituitary cerebral or vascular anomalies. Clinical and biochemical assessment was done in all patients.
Results: Out of the total eight patients with EN, MRI showed interrupted pituitary stalk in five patients (62.5%) and nonvisible pituitary stalk in three patients (37.5%). Ectopic posterior pituitary bright spot was demonstrated in median eminence in six patients (75%), faintly visualized in one patient (12.5%) and nonvisualized in another one patient. Statistical significant association was noted between pituitary gland height and patient’s body height with the pituitary gland volume (P < 0.001). Varied extra-pituitary cerebral anomalies encountered in our patients ranged from isolated anomalies such as optic nerve hypoplasia in three patients (37.5%), corpus callosum dysplasia in four patients (50%), agyria-pachygyria complex in two patients (25%), and intracranial vascular anomalies in two patients to syndromic association of tuberous sclerosis in one patient.
Conclusion: Identifying and reporting of associated extra-pituitary cerebral anomalies in patients with EN are crucial in assessing the overall neurological outcome of such patients.
Keywords: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Pituitary Stalk Interruption, Posterior Pituitary

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