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Original research article


An Integrated Interactive-Spaced Education Radiology Curriculum for Preclinical Students.

Eli TshibwabwaRobert MallinMadeleine FraserMartin TshibwabwaReza SaniiJames RiceJenifer Cannon
Departments of Clinical Medicine,Physiology and Behavior and Neuroscience, American University of Antigua College of Medicine, University Park, P. O. Box W1451, Coolidge, Antigua and BarbudaDepartment of Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, 3Notre- Dame Secondary Catholic School, Student Success Centre, Providence Catholic School Board, 700 Bristol Street, Woodstock, ON, Canada
Date of Submission: 26-Jan-2017, Date of Acceptance: 19-Mar-2017, Date of Web Publication: 24-May-2017.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Eli Tshibwabwa

Department of Clinical Medicine, American University of Antigua College of Medicine, University Park, P. O. Box W1451, Coolidge, Antigua and Barbuda.
E-mail: etumba@auamed.net

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Eli Tshibwabwa

Department of Clinical Medicine, American University of Antigua College of Medicine, University Park, P. O. Box W1451, Coolidge, Antigua and Barbuda.
E-mail: etumba@auamed.net

DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_1_17 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT



Introduction: The objective of this study is to determine whether a radiology module, together with online spaced education, helps students of an integrated problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum increase their radiology knowledge and long-term retention.
Materials and Methods: Second-year students at the American University of Antigua College of Medicine participated in small groups of ten students each into two 2 h of radiology laboratories. The study comprised two cohorts: winter and fall 2013 students (control group) and 2014 students (experimental group). Both groups used face-to-face PBL. The students of the experimental group received additional online-spaced education. The skills were assessed for both groups before the beginning of laboratories and 4 weeks and 7 months after laboratories.
Results: There was no significant difference on pretest between the control and experimental groups. On completion of the radiology laboratories, comparison of test results before and after training showed net improvement for both groups. The corresponding difference for the experimental group was higher compared to the one for the control group (7.83 vs. 6.21, P < 0.001). The difference between the scores on delayed test and pretest showed that the students of both groups demonstrated average knowledge improvement even though their level of performance was slightly below the posttest. The corresponding difference for the experimental group did not differ much from the posttest (P > 0.05), and no significant difference of scores was observed 7 months later for either group. Further, a higher percentage of the students in the experimental group strongly agreed that their learning objectives were met (92% vs. 71%, P < 0.001), and this trend persisted throughout the study.
Conclusion: Online spaced education combined to a face-to-face PBL enhances not only the student’s knowledge of basic radiology along with his/her self-assessment skills but also the long-term retention of radiology material and satisfaction with the integrated interactive system-based module. Future research is needed to see if medical students in need of additional education support may benefit from spaced education in the field of remediation.
Keywords: Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Student's Education, Online Spaced Education, Preclinical Curriculum, Problem-based Learning

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