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Case report


Snapping Pes Anserinus and the Diagnostic Utility of Dynamic Ultrasound.

Shane A ShapiroLorenzo O HernandezDaniel P Montero
Departments of Orthopedic Surgery, Family Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA
Date of Submission: 28-Jun-2017, Date of Acceptance: 17-Aug-2017, Date of Web Publication: 17-Oct-2017.
Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Shane A Shapiro

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.
E-mail: shapiro.shane@mayo.edu

Corresponding Author:
Corresponding Author

Shane A Shapiro

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA.
E-mail: shapiro.shane@mayo.edu

DOI: 10.4103/jcis.JCIS_45_17 Facebook Twitter Google Linkedin

ABSTRACT


Snapping pes anserinus syndrome is an often encountered cause of medial knee snapping. It results from impingement and translation of the gracilis tendon or semitendinosus tendon over the osseous structures of the knee during active flexion and extension. Ultrasonography is often the diagnostic imaging test of choice in cases of mechanical snapping. We report 2 cases of painful snapping pes anserinus and highlight the value of dynamic ultrasound in making an accurate diagnosis so as to direct care.
Keywords: Dynamic Ultrasound, Gracilis Tendon, Pes Anserinus, Snapping Pes Anserinus Syndrome, Snapping Pes Syndrome

Cited in 1 Document

  1. Julio Cesar Gali, Bárbara Lívia C. Serafim, Samir Alexandre Nassar, Julio Cesar Gali Filho and Robert F. LaPrade (2019) Percutaneous Lengthening of a Regenerated Semitendinosus Tendon for Medial Hamstring Snapping. Arthroscopy Techniques 8(3):e349. doi: 10.1016/j.eats.2018.11.004

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